Pledge of Allegiance -

Cher Ami was a homing pigeon owned and flown by the U.S. Army Signal Corps in France during World War I. He helped save the Lost Battalion of the 77th Division in the battle of the Argonne, October 1918. In his last mission, he delivered a message despite having been shot through the breast, being blinded in one eye, covered in blood, and having a leg hanging only by a tendon. The bird was awarded the Croix de Guerre for heroic service delivering 12 important messages in Verdun, France.

The New York Bird Club requests that June 13 be declared as National Pigeon Day so that pigeons can be properly recognized as heroes.

Sunday, June 14, 2009

Post National Pigeon Day.......

Amos Latteier in his pigeon suit talks to Anne-Marie Richard about her gallery's pigeon-inspired art, as they advocate for the establishment of National Pigeon Day on June 13.
Source: New York Daily News

Photos:
Maribeth's photos.
Enid & Enik puppet play on YouTube:

Part 1:

Part 2

Thank you Jessica Perilla Studios for taking these great photos of the event.
Note: If you plan to use the photos, please reference National Pigeon Day 2009.

We would like to thank Dr. Jeff of Pet Rox for coming by and performing and to all of the speakers, entertainers and guests, and a special thank you to Christine Mott, our Mistress of Ceremonies -- we couldn't have done it (so well) without you!

2 comments:

  1. Nice and interesting articles. I love pigeons...
    but many people are not happy for them. I have many pigeons being bred in my back yard. Keep up the good work sir thanks for giving pigeons a chance to live free and feel free... God bless you and your family... You can exchange link if you want i will add you in my blog list and you will add me in yours. Again Thank you!!!

    ReplyDelete
  2. its the bhaddest chickNovember 24, 2009 at 12:47 PM

    can you please tell me why you adore pigeons so much when others despice them ? also can you tell me if theres actully a real pigeon day and what do they do there?

    ReplyDelete